• Dealing With the Loss of a Loved One

    July 9, 2019
  • Is there a “best way” to go about dealing with the loss of a loved one?

    Dealing with the loss of a loved one is a challenge practically everyone faces at one time or another. Each person grieves in their own way and it can be particularly challenging.

    The Five Stages of Grief When Dealing with the Loss of a Loved One

    Dealing with the loss of a loved one can be overwhelmingly painful. Grief can permeate every aspect of your life and make it difficult to enjoy the things you used to. Although human beings are naturally resilient, many people struggle with grief for long periods of time. In 1969, psychiatrist Elisabeth Kübler-Ross presented five stages of grief in her book On Death and Dying.

    It’s important to understand that the stages of grief are not linear, and can occur in any order when dealing with the loss of a loved one. The five stages of grief include:

    1. Denial: In the denial stage, you may be in a state of shock and life and feel numb. Life and the world may seem to make no sense. In this stage, many people simply go through the motions to get through the day and cope with the situation. Denial helps those dealing with the loss of a loved one by protecting them from being overwhelmed with pain and sadness. As you become stronger and denial begins to fade, feelings of grief may start to surface.
    2. Anger: Anger is a normal and necessary stage of the healing process. When dealing with the loss of a loved one, you may feel angry at your family, friends, your higher power, and even the loved one who died. Anger can be an anchor that gives you a chance to release some of your negative feelings so you can move on to deal with the pain underneath.
    3. Bargaining: When dealing with the loss of a loved one, bargaining may take the form of “If only……” or “What if….” Guilt often accompanies bargaining, as if there is something you could have done differently to prevent the loss of your loved one. While it’s okay to entertain the “what ifs” for a bit, blaming yourself or trying to negotiate your way out of the pain doesn’t work.
    4. Depression: After bargaining, more intense feelings may start to arise. Even though it may feel like it will never end, depression is an appropriate and necessary response to a great loss. When dealing with the loss of a loved one, grief counseling is a useful tool that can help you better understand and process this depressive stage. Reaching out to trusted friends and family members who are also dealing with the loss of a loved one can allow you to provide support for each other and facilitate mutual healing as well.
    5. Acceptance: In this stage of grief your emotions begin to stabilize. You absorb the reality of the situation and come to terms with it. You will still have bad days, but they’ll be mixed with some good ones, too. You may feel like a fog has lifted and you’re ready to face the world again by engaging with friends, family, and doing the things you enjoy.

    If you’re Dealing with the Loss of a Loved One, Florida Family Cremations can Help

    At Florida Family Cremations, our professional and compassionate team is here to help those dealing with the loss of a loved one. We offer personalized cremation services and are dedicated to helping families through the grieving process. For more information, call us today at 727-223-5911. For those who are faced with handling cremation services immediately following their loved one’s passing, Florida Family Cremations will be by your side throughout the entire process. Cremation pre planning can give your friends and family the space and time they need to grieve their loss without having to worry about making arrangements after your passing.

    If your loved one was a veteran, you may want to seek out professionals who specialize in cremation services for veterans to ensure you honor them with care so you can start the healing process. Although dealing with the loss of a loved one can be daunting, understanding grief and utilizing the resources available to you can help you get through the process and come out stronger on the other side.