• How to Grieve the Loss of a Loved One While Social Distancing

  • How to Grieve the Loss of a Loved One While Social Distancing

    With social distancing measures in place due to the COVID-19 pandemic, many families aren’t sure how to grieve the loss of a loved one who has passed. Being unable to hold traditional funeral services or memorial gatherings to mourn and celebrate the lives of their loved ones has left many wondering how to deal with grief during these difficult times. Even though the pandemic has created physical space between people, there are ways to cope with grief and work through the healing process.

    Let Yourself Feel It

    Grieving is very personal, and there is no set formula for how to deal with grief after the loss of a loved one. It’s important to acknowledge that feelings of loss, sadness, and grief are real and normal. Ignoring feelings of grief is unhealthy and impedes the healing process in the long run. Even if you’re not sure about how to grieve right now, letting yourself feel whatever comes up and allowing yourself to cry is a good start on the path to healing.

    Writing down your thoughts and feelings in a journal, looking at pictures, and listening to music your loved one liked are just a few ways to help yourself cope and remember them. Creating art, cooking your loved one’s favorite meal, or simply lighting a candle and ruminating on what your loved one meant to you can all be productive ways to process grief. If your loved one was cremated, you may want to bury some of their ashes in the ground and plant a tree in their memory.

    Plan a Memorial Service for the Future

    Even though you can’t hold a memorial service now, there’s no reason why you can’t start planning one for the future if you want to. Although you may be unsure of when the service will happen, it’s important to remember that social distancing won’t last forever. You don’t need a date to start planning and it can give you a sense of peace and relief, knowing that one day you’ll be able to celebrate your loved one as you envisioned. Starting now also gives you some extra time to collaborate with family and friends. Keep in mind that they’re feeling the loss too, and may not know how to grieve during these challenging times. Being involved in planning may help them as well.

    Reach Out to Others

    Being cut off from friends and family is difficult, but there are ways you can learn how to grieve together while social distancing rules are in place. Connecting with others is healing, and can help you be more open about sharing your feelings. Gathering with friends and family via video chat allows you to share stories about your loved one, mourn together, and find the human connection you need to help you through the grieving process. If video chatting isn’t possible, social media groups, calling or texting can also be a good way to communicate and stay connected. Creating a card or small photo collage to send through the mail can also give people something tangible to remember your loved one.

    Seek Help

    If you’re having trouble with figuring out how to grieve the loss of your loved one, professional therapists and counselors offer video and phone sessions, and there are tons of bereavement and grief support groups you can turn to on the internet. Just talking about your feelings and your loved one can provide a sense of relief and help you deal with the loss.

    Contact Florida Family Cremations to Learn More

    If you’re looking for affordable cremation services in Clearwater, Florida Family Cremations can help. Whether you have an immediate need for direct cremation or you’re considering cremation pre planning, our knowledgeable, compassionate staff can help you understand your options and answer any questions you may have about cremation pricing. We also offer cremation services for veterans to ensure your loved one is laid to rest with honor. Call us at today at 727-223-5911, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. We proudly offer cremation services in Florida communities such as Pinellas, Hillsborough, Pasco and Manatee Counties.